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University Communications

Communication from the university regarding the growing COVID-19 epidemic and plans to address concerns regarding spread within the Hopkins community. Full communication from 3.2.20

A message from President Ron Daniels addressing the COVID-19 epidemic, closing JHU early for spring break, and announcing remote instruction until April 12. Full communication from 3.10.20

A message from Dean Fred Bronstein addressing the COVID-19 epidemic and Peabody specific information related to campus closing. Full communication from 3.10.20

Information from the Office of Student Affairs for students who have the need to remain in on-campus housing. Full communication from 3.10.20

Updates from the Office of Student Affairs to students who requested to remain in on-campus housing. Full communication from 3.13.20

A message from President Ron Daniels announcing transition to remote learning for the remainder of the Spring 2020 semester. Full communication from 3.18.20

A message from Dean Fred Bronstein addressing Peabody-specific details regarding the continuation of remote learning for the remainder of the Spring 2020 semester. Full communication from 3.18.20

A message from President Ron Daniels addressing the postponement of the 2020 in-person commencement ceremony, and announcing a virtual recognition for graduating students. Full communication from 3.18.20

Details regarding campus access, remote instruction, student employment, and student support during this period of remote learning from the Office of Student Affairs. Full communication from 3.20.20

Detailed resources for Peabody graduate students from the Offices of Student and Academic Affairs. Full communication from 3.23.20

Detailed resources for Peabody graduate students from the Offices of Student and Academic Affairs. Full communication from 3.23.20

Email from the Vice President for Facilities and Real Estate & the Vice Provost and Chief Risk Officer addressing facilities updates. Full communication from 3.23.20

Detailed information regarding updates to grading policies for the Spring 2020 semester. Full communication from 3.26.20

Updates for Residential students from the Office of Student Affairs regarding pro-rated credits for housing & meal plan charges, as well as the status of belongings remaining in the residence halls. Full communication from 3.28.20

A message from university leadership regarding the Governor’s Stay at Home order. Full communication from 3.30.20

Updates to mail policy on campus. Full communication from 4.2.20

Message from university leadership extending remote programs through June 30 and other updates for staff, faculty, and students. Full communication from 4.6.20

A message from President Daniels praising the response of the Hopkins community to COVID-19. Full communication from 4.7.20

A message from Dean Bronstein announcing that students have an extended deadline to take a Leave of Absence with a 40% tuition refund until April 17. There is also additional information about options for graduating students. Full communication from 4.10.20

A message from Dean Mathews sharing the link students can use to request a letter grade for their courses. Full communication from 4.10.20

A message from President Ron Daniels detailing the financial impact on JHU of the COVID-19 pandemic. Full communication from 4.21.20

A message from Dean Bronstein sharing Peabody-specific financial impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. Full communication from 4.21.20

Announcing the new availability of telehealth resources for Johns Hopkins students and learners. Full communication from 4.24.20

Information from President Daniels and Provost Kumar regarding planning for the next academic year. Full communication from 5.5.20

Announcement of students nominated for advisory committee, including two Peabody students. Full communication from 5.12.20

A message from university leadership regarding the governor’s decision to lift the stay-at-home order effective 5.15. Full communication from 5.14.20

Announcement from Vice Provost for Research on plans to allow researchers to return to campus. Full communication from 5.19.20

Draft of recommended health and safety protocols to put in place when the university makes the decision to begin its gradual, multi-phase resumption of on-campus activities. Full communication from 5.28.20

Announcement from President Daniels that the Return to Campus Guidelines were available for comment. Full communication from 6.4.20

In a message to the Johns Hopkins community Friday, university leaders outlined its current plans and timeline for ensuring the safe return of students, faculty, and staff to university campuses for learning and research. Full communication from 6.5.20

Message from Dean Bronstein addressing Peabody-specific plans for returning to campus. Full communication from 6.8.20

JHU leadership outline plans for the undergraduate experience at JHU this fall. Full communication from 6.30.20

Dean Bronstein announces Peabody specific plans for the 2020-21 Academic Year. Full communication from 6.30.20

First, we want to reiterate how much the Peabody Conservatory values you as a person and for your contributions to our community. Our international students are an integral part of our campus and community life. We share your serious concerns about the new federal regulations affecting student visas, and we are committed to doing everything we can to enable you to continue in your Peabody studies. After examining the announced SEVP guidance in conjunction with University leaders, we believe our plan for hybrid instruction as announced last week will allow international students to begin or continue their studies in the U.S. this fall. Importantly, Peabody‚Äôs current plan for the fall includes continuing some in-person instruction for each of the 15 weeks including the final two weeks of the semester, after the Thanksgiving break. According to Student and Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP) Guidance, this would mean that new and returning international students will qualify for the Category Three hybrid operational model. OIS will need to reissue specially-notated I-20s for those who have already had one issued, and that office will be in direct communication with you in the near future about that, so please continue to monitor your email for changes and potential next steps. We are in constant communication with OIS and will continue to monitor this developing situation. While we hope to welcome you back in Baltimore as planned, we are also committed to delivering the entire curriculum online. If you choose to remain outside of the U.S., or are unable to travel to Baltimore, you can take all of your classes and make progress toward completing your degree as scheduled. We will be reaching out to all students in the coming days to confirm your plans for studying either on-site or remotely this fall. We understand that the potential impact of these new rules on you and your international student colleagues may be causing you a great deal of anxiety. Please note that the Student Wellness office has compiled strategies and resources that can help you take care of yourself during this very uncertain time. Indeed, the entire Peabody community stands to suffer and ‚Äď given the unpredictable nature of the COVID-19 pandemic and our continuing need to be vigilant in responding to it ‚Äď we know that our best-laid plans could still change. Should we see an outbreak of COVID on campus, or the State of Maryland resumes stay-at-home or lockdown orders, all classes will move to remote instruction. Unfortunately, the latest SEVIS guidance specifically addresses such a scenario, and would require all international students to depart the U.S. immediately. We are seeking elimination of this provision, but at this time, it will apply to any switch to remote instruction at any time during fall. We will keep you informed of any news or updates, and will continue to work with you to navigate these particularly difficult challenges. Sincerely, Fred Bronstein, Dean Abra Bush, Senior Associate Dean of Institute Studies Townsend Plant, Associate Dean for Enrollment and Student Life

Dear Peabody Students, Faculty, and Staff: We join with the entire Johns Hopkins community in celebrating today’s news which restores some measure of needed flexibility for our international students as the fall semester approaches. The opportunity to work with colleagues from around the world enriches the Peabody experience for all. Our international students are such an integral part of our community, and it is a great relief that the visa rules announced last week have been reversed. While there will still be challenges ahead, we remain committed to ensuring that every Peabody student has the opportunity to advance in their studies this fall. As our preparations to deliver the curriculum in a variety of modalities continue, we will remain in touch and we look forward to welcoming you back — on-site or learning remotely — soon. Best, Fred

Dean Bronstein announces plans regarding the fall 2020 semester and the decision to move to a fully online modality for the fall. Full communication from 7.31.20

To offer some relief, and in alignment with the University’s decision announced today to reduce Homewood undergraduate tuition by 10%, Peabody with assistance from the University will reduce the cost of attendance by making a one-time reduction in its planned fall semester undergraduate tuition of 10%. Full communication from 8.6.20

Dear Johns Hopkins Community: We write today to share the deeply disappointing news that we will not be able to come back together on our campuses this fall as we had planned. We will instead offer the fall 2020 semester online for all undergraduates and online with minimal exceptions for graduate students. As you know, our community has been working tirelessly to ready ourselves for a safe return to on-campus activities, shaped by the current science and best practices outlined by our public health experts, including our Health Advisory Group, and local, state, and national guidance. Unfortunately, the pandemic is worsening with cases trending in the wrong direction in our region and in states across the country. At the end of June, the daily rate of new COVID infections in Baltimore was 9 per 100,000; now it is 27 per 100,000, with the infection becoming particularly prevalent among young adults. Of particular concern, more than 30% of our undergraduates come from states designated as COVID hot spots. We have been operating successfully at a low density in controlled environments such as research labs and clinical settings, subject to strict public health requirements, but classrooms, co-curricular activities, and residential settings, taken together, pose a substantially greater potential for spread of the disease. Therefore, with the health and safety of our students, our faculty, and staff, and our neighbors in the broader Baltimore community foremost in mind, and after extensive consultation with our University Pandemic Academic Advisory Committee and Student Advisory Committee about a wide range of alternatives, we reluctantly made the very difficult but necessary decision to change course and move to virtual modalities. We will, of course, continue to follow the trajectory of the pandemic with the hope that we can convene together in the spring. Here‚Äôs what you can expect with this change of plans: ‚ÄĘ All undergraduate instruction and activities this semester will be online. We are asking all undergraduates not to come to Baltimore at this time, as we will not be conducting academic or co-curricular activities for them on campus. As in the spring, students who have a demonstrated hardship related to their living situation or educational needs can apply for an exception to live on campus while taking courses online. ‚ÄĘ Graduate and professional programs will continue to evaluate their own operations, but graduate student instruction is expected to remain in an online/remote modality with few exceptions beyond on-campus research permitted under our Phase 1 guidelines. Graduate schools will be permitted, with approval from the Provost‚Äôs Office, to offer limited, in-person activities such as instruction for specific student cohorts or clinical, internship, laboratory, or practicum experiences that can be conducted safely with appropriate precautions. ‚ÄĘ For both undergraduate and graduate students, the university is helping its divisions provide a range of financial supports and cost reductions for students and their families during this very difficult time, including a one-time 10% reduction in the planned fall tuition for undergraduates. These measures vary among programs based on students‚Äô needs and will be communicated by each division. ‚ÄĘ On-campus research activities will continue in accordance with the Phase 1 Return to Research Guidelines. This will include maintaining the occupancy rule in Hopkins laboratories at 400 gross square feet per person, or down to 200 gross square feet per person with an approved plan and use of nonlaboratory spaces when necessary while continuing to observe physical distance and other safety measures. ‚ÄĘ All employees who can work from home will continue to do so, and we expect that will be the case at least through the end of 2020. By working remotely, our staff are making a critical contribution to de-densifying our campuses so that we can safely resume critical in-person operations. Please look for resources and support programs on our HR website, including upcoming enhancements related to child care and other caregiving demands, which we know are placing tremendous strain on our community. ‚ÄĘ Health and safety remain our top priorities. We will issue updated guidance soon for those who have an exception or demonstrated hardship that requires them to be on campus. It will include updates on how to participate in daily self-monitoring of COVID-19 symptoms, protocols for required testing of those students with permission to live on campus. More detailed information on plans specific to each school will be shared in the coming days by your divisions, and we will continue to update the information on the university’s coronavirus information website. We remain immensely grateful to our entire community for your persistence, creativity, and determination. We are particularly thankful to all of you who have worked so hard over the past four months to explore every possible permutation for a return to campus life and to prepare us to deliver a compelling and valuable Hopkins experience to all we serve. The thorough planning and innovative ideas mean that we are prepared to provide the Johns Hopkins experience that we all know is possible regardless of the circumstances in which it is delivered and stand ready to reconvene fully in person when public health conditions permit. As ever, we are fortunate to be part of such an exceptional community and look forward to working alongside you once more this fall. Sincerely, Ronald J. Daniels President Sunil Kumar Provost Daniel Ennis Senior Vice President for Finance and Operations

Dear Peabody students,

Last week I wrote to you regarding our decision to reduce the cost of attendance for our undergraduate students by making a one-time, 10% reduction in the fall semester tuition in response to the impact of COVID-19, in recognition of and response to the anxiety and hardship many of our students are facing, as well as the continued pressure around the cost of your education. At that time I indicated that we would be reviewing how we might provide relief to our graduate students.

I am pleased to announce today that with the assistance of the University and the approval of the University’s Board of Trustees, we will similarly reduce full-time graduate student tuition by making a one-time reduction in our planned fall semester graduate tuition of 10%. The adjustment for all students will be reflected in your bills. Those of you who have already paid your fall tuition will receive a refund of the discounted amount.

In addition, Peabody continues to stand ready to assist all students with financial hardships that have emerged as a result of changing circumstances. Since spring, Peabody has been able to provide approximately $400,000 in additional aid due to COVID-related need, including $162,000 in CARES Act funding which has been distributed to eligible students. As we did in the spring, we encourage students experiencing financial difficulties related to the switch to remote learning to appeal to the office of Financial Aid for emergency support.

I am pleased that we are able to assist all our students at this difficult time, and hope that in some way this tuition action will help alleviate some of your concerns and make it easier to focus on your studies this fall.

Sincerely,
Fred Bronstein

Dean

Dear Johns Hopkins Community: We know the recent decision to continue to hold all undergraduate classes and most graduate classes online and limit access to our campuses through the fall semester has been disappointing. We are deeply grateful for the commitment of everyone in our community to continue to protect the health of others and do as much work as possible remotely. Until public health conditions improve, we will stay in Phase 1 of our reopening plan, which means access to campus facilities will remain strictly limited. For those who will need to be in our buildings and on our grounds in the coming months, we have posted a revised version of our Return to Campus Guidance. It includes a great deal of important information about health and safety guidelines, campus operations during this phase, and support and resources for our affiliates. Please review the document and continue to look for updates and frequently asked questions on the JHU Coronavirus Information website. Health and safety guidance continues to be in effect, and safety ambassadors will be reminding people on campus to wear a face covering correctly and at all times, wash their hands, keep a 6-foot distance from others, and stay at home if they have symptoms. As discussed in the original guidance, smoking and vaping are not allowed on any JHU property during the pandemic, as they interfere with wearing masks and create health concerns. Smoking and tobacco cessation resources are available for faculty and staff and for students. According to the new guidance in this area, anyone coming to campus will be required to have an influenza vaccination this fall, and more information will be coming about how to get one free of charge. In addition, individuals will have to complete a daily health check by using the Prodensity mobile app, in which they will be asked questions about whether they are experiencing COVID symptoms. Affiliates who indicate they have no symptoms will receive a green ‚Äúbadge‚ÄĚ in the app that they can show to campus security and area supervisors as needed for the next 12 hours. If affiliates answer yes to one of the questions, they will receive a red ‚Äúbadge‚ÄĚ and need to call the Johns Hopkins COVID Call Center (JHCCC). The JHCCC continues to be available seven days a week between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. by calling 833-546-7546. Anyone in the Johns Hopkins community experiencing COVID-19 symptoms or concerned about exposure can get help and, if they meet the requirements and are located near Baltimore, will be referred for testing. The Return to Campus Guidance also discusses alterations to the use of campus facilities, details about transportation, and expectations for using elevators and public restrooms. It outlines ways to ask for an adjustment or accommodation if you are required to be on campus but think that you cannot come to work safely. And it discusses support services for mental well-being and caregiving needs. These wide-ranging instructions and best practices are vital for creating an environment where our faculty, students, and staff can continue any work that cannot be done elsewhere while keeping each other safe from the coronavirus. We need everyone to be vigilant about adhering to these practices when they are at Johns Hopkins, and every member of our community is empowered to request compliance by others, including by notifying the JHU hotline at 844-SPEAK2US (844-773-2528) of any issues on campus. Several members of our planning team will discuss the Return to Campus Guidance and answer questions at a town hall at 1 p.m. on Tuesday, August 25. You can submit questions in advance at covidtownhall@jhu.edu. We also welcome your feedback on all of our planning efforts through the online feedback form. Thank you for everything you are doing to make our mission possible under difficult circumstances. We will continue to assess the situation, evaluate our approaches, and keep you informed. On behalf of the JHU 2020 Planning Task Force, Stephen Gange Professor and Executive Vice Provost for Academic Affairs Jon Links Professor, Vice Provost and Chief Risk and Compliance Officer Jane Schlegel Vice President and Chief Administrative Officer

Dear Peabody students, faculty, and staff, Since announcing that Peabody would be fully online for the fall semester, we have been working through a number of questions around the use of space as it pertains to practice, collaborative rehearsal, and applied instruction. We know these issues are important to you and have worked to develop policies that address your requests while keeping our community safe. I am writing to outline several new Peabody policies which are in effect immediately. Use of Peabody Facilities for Practice ‚Äď Beginning on August 31, the Peabody Institute will grant students limited access to campus practice rooms and dance studios for the sole purpose of solo practice. Practice Rooms will be available to students from Monday through Saturday between 12:00 pm and 6:00 pm and must be booked in advance. Under this policy, the maximum number of students on the campus at any time is 37. Under no circumstances will more than one person be permitted in a practice room at any time. There is a mandatory down time between each user to allow for proper air circulation and filtration, and all students must adhere to procedural guidelines and health and safety policies. The full details on the Practice Room policy can be found in the 2020-21 Student Resources section of the Peabody web site. Additional details about reserving rooms will be shared soon. Applied Lessons ‚Äď For the foreseeable future, face-to-face applied lessons are not permitted. This is for the protection of students, faculty members, and all who either reside with them or with whom they come into contact. We will continue to monitor the feasibility of face-to-face instruction in light of public health conditions, but do not expect that in-person applied lessons will be allowed until we are back on site in some form of hybrid modality. Group or Collaborative Rehearsal ‚Äď While we understand that students would like to work collaboratively with other students face to face in Baltimore or in your hometowns, we cannot allow on-campus collaborative artistic work at this time nor recommend or condone off-campus collaborative work. Again, we will continue to monitor the feasibility of this request; however, until further notice in-person collaborative rehearsal will not be allowed on campus, nor recommended or condoned as an off-campus activity. Access to campus for student practice is designed in accordance with health and safety protocols set forth by Johns Hopkins University. It is critical that students abide by all the guidelines outlined in the policy, for everyone’s safety. PLEASE NOTE that this policy could change at any time and without notice in response to public health concerns and/or due to changes in health and safety protocols mandated by the University or the State of Maryland. As we have noted in prior communications, we are recommending that students remain at home, and do not come to Baltimore at this time. This campus use policy is designed to assist students who are in Baltimore, and whose options for practice space are otherwise limited. We will continue to monitor and evaluate campus use as we move forward. Thank you for your patience as we have worked to design a viable system. Best, Fred Bronstein

Dear Students in Friday Noon:30 Recital Series, The Peabody Conservatory has maintained an afternoon concert series since the 1873-1874 school year. When pianist Madame Falk-Auerbach first introduced the afternoon concert series, then on Wednesdays, she imagined an opportunity for innovative programming performed by students. We are happy to announce that the concert series will continue this fall. However, unlike previous years, the concert series will not be a class. Accordingly, the course PY.360.501 will be removed from your schedule. The faculty and leadership will consider the role of the concert series in your schedule for the spring and beyond. Meanwhile, you are strongly encouraged and sincerely welcomed to keep the Peabody tradition by attending the Friday Noon:30 concerts as they are announced. Do keep your schedule clear and your browser open to support your colleague-artists each Friday this fall. Sincerely, Dr. Mathews

Dear Johns Hopkins Community: We are embarking on a fall term that will be unlike any other. For new students, you are likely starting your Hopkins experience in a way that‚Äôs a lot different than what you imagined. For the large majority of returning students, it probably feels odd to go ‚Äúback to school‚ÄĚ without being on campus. But we are in the midst of a serious pandemic. We are fortunate that positive cases at JHU to date have been limited and contained, including a recent cluster of positive COVID-19 cases among a small group of returning undergraduates living off-campus in Charles Village, and for which contact investigation protocols have been enacted by contacting any directly impacted individuals. Nevertheless, it serves as a reminder that we have a collective responsibility to help maintain our community‚Äôs health and safety. The university stands prepared to support you in that effort with enhanced programming and staff this fall, and to share some of the best practices that have shown their effectiveness in the safe operations of our labs and other research facilities during the summer. Wellness Website Wellness.jhu.edu provides students with a comprehensive guide to Hopkins wellness, including: ‚ÄĘ A digital library of university health and wellness resources, searchable by academic division. ‚ÄĘ A dedicated COVID page that serves as an easy reference for pandemic-related personal health care information. ‚ÄĘ A blog with helpful, timely advice on topics such as emotional self-care during the pandemic, coping strategies and resources for racial trauma, and wellness resources for international students. Our office also supports a regularly updated Instagram account (@jhuwellness) that highlights wellness resources, events, and news relevant to Hopkins students. University Wellness Providers The Student Health and Wellness Center (serving KSAS, WSE, and Peabody) and University Health Services Primary Care (serving Medicine, Nursing, and Public Health) are open and operational for primary care needs. If you would like to speak with a medical provider, please call your respective health center, and staff will determine an appropriate course of action based on your geographic location, presenting symptoms, and insurance needs. Telemedicine visits are available only to people currently in Maryland. Please visit the JHU Wellness website to clarify which resources are available to you, particularly if you are enrolled in AAP, EP, SAIS, Carey, or SOE. The Johns Hopkins COVID-19 Call Center (JHCCC), which can be reached at 833-546-7546 seven days a week from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., supports all JHU students, faculty, and staff experiencing COVID-19 symptoms. Primarily intended for those currently within driving distance of Baltimore, the JHCCC will evaluate your symptoms, order testing if needed, and conduct contact investigation for those affiliates who test positive. More information on the JHCCC and testing is on the coronavirus information website. Mental Health Resources University mental health providers continue to consult and provide services to students, primarily via telehealth. Contact the Counseling Center, University Health Services Mental Health, or the Johns Hopkins Student Assistance Program (JHSAP) to discuss options for care. Please visit the JHU Wellness website to clarify which center(s) serve your school. In addition to university mental health providers, the following resources are also available. ‚ÄĘ The university has extended its partnership with TimelyMD to augment our current services and make mental telehealth counseling free and available to all Johns Hopkins students. Originally launched in April and now available through Jan. 24, 2021, TimelyMD has been a popular and safe way to access talk therapy. New features include limited psychiatry services accessible through a JHU mental health provider referral. Learn more about TimelyMD, including how to access it, on the wellness blog. ‚ÄĘ Hopkins affiliates enjoy free premium access to the Calm app and its meditation instruction, sleep assistance, mindful movement and stretching tutorials, and relaxing music. ‚ÄĘ Full-time students also have access to the SilverCloud platform, an interactive online learning module for cognitive behavioral therapy techniques. Diversity and Inclusion It has always been our mission to provide students with high-quality medical and wellness services. We also recognize that this has been a time of extreme stress and uncertainty, and that the dual pandemics of COVID-19 and systemic racism have disproportionately impacted Black people and other people of color. We are listening and committed to meaningful actions to support underrepresented and marginalized students. A recent wellness blog post summarized some recent efforts, including the hiring of additional counselors and ongoing training for clinical staff. COVID-19 Precautions and Influenza Vaccinations After the university learned of the small cluster of undergraduates who tested positive for COVID-19, the JHCCC conducted its contact investigation process, and we are working with those students to prevent further spread of the virus. A JHU affiliate dashboard to be posted soon will track data on the number of tests administered by Hopkins along with numbers on positive and negative test results. We want to emphasize once again the seriousness of the pandemic, the ease with which it can spread, and the need to be vigilant in following public health guidelines. The university‚Äôs decision to conduct the fall semester online for undergraduates and most graduate students does not eliminate the risk of infection, and we continue to urge those students who do not need to be in Baltimore for the fall semester not to travel back. Wherever you are located, we encourage you to follow public health guidelines for preventing the spread of COVID-19. Actions such as wearing face coverings, washing your hands frequently, staying at least six feet from others, and restricting your travel will be vitally important for everyone this fall. We also refer you to these tips, which apply universally and have been successfully implemented in the limited campus operations that have resumed. Any JHU affiliates on campus for any reason, whether indoors or outside, are required to use the Prodensity app. All members of our community should, of course, be mindful of their health and be alert for symptoms. Testing for COVID-19 will also be part of our ongoing efforts. Again, all affiliates who have COVID-19-related symptoms and are in the Baltimore area should contact the JHCCC. Undergraduate students who have been granted an exception to live in university housing will be required to participate in testing upon arrival and regularly throughout the semester. While students, staff, and faculty who are on campus are required to get a seasonal flu vaccination, we highly recommend that everyone get one this year. We are currently working out the details for a free influenza vaccination program in partnership with a retail pharmacy, making the program available to all Johns Hopkins University students, whether on campus or in off-campus housing. The small number of students who have been granted an exception to live in university housing must provide proof that they have received the vaccine or be vaccinated at move-in. More details have been provided to those students. We welcome your questions and input about our approach to health and wellness at Hopkins. Please email your ideas and concerns to wellness@jhu.edu. In this time of change and uncertainty, we will continue to innovate and implement the best ways to support all Hopkins students in maintaining and improving their physical and mental health. Be well, Kevin G. Shollenberger Vice Provost for Student Health and Well-Being

Dear Peabody students, faculty, and staff: As the fall semester begins, we are furthering our commitment to the health and safety of our community by implementing the use of a new health screening tool and required precautionary measures. These measures are consistent with all of Johns Hopkins University and are mandatory for any and all individuals who will physically be on campus for any reason this fall. As a reminder, access to campus remains limited to essential on-site personnel, a limited number of students as outlined in the access to campus for practice policy, and those whose irregular or occasional need to come to campus has been approved by my office. The vast majority of our work and activities this fall will continue to be performed remotely. Everyone who intends to be on campus in any capacity must schedule their visit in advance through the appropriate channels and comply with the following requirements: ‚ÄĘ Daily health check using Prodensity (see more information below) ‚ÄĘ Use of appropriate face coverings and adherence to other health/safety guidance, including physical distancing and hand washing ‚ÄĘ No smoking or vaping ‚ÄĘ Students must have complete health forms on file: Please note that if you are a first year student (undergraduate or graduate), you must be in compliance with all pre-entrance health requirements before you may access campus for the purpose of practicing. If you have any questions please reach out to peabodystudentaffairs@jhu.edu. Beginning Monday, August 31, individuals returning to the Peabody campus will be required to complete a daily health check on a mobile app/website called Prodensity. The short questionnaire will ask specific questions to assess a user‚Äôs actual symptoms and exposure risks. Answers will yield a campus access status pass, which will be used to grant or deny campus access. You may not report to campus unless you have a green campus pass and have scheduled your time on campus in advance through the Dean‚Äôs Office or the ArtsVision practice room reservation system. Download Prodensity here: https://prodensity.jh.edu/welcome. If you are unable to use Prodensity, the COVID Health Check tool is available through a webform on myJH. More details about the Prodensity app, and enforcement of its use, are available here. In addition, beginning on November 1, individuals who will be on campus will also be required to have had a flu shot. Thank you in advance for your adherence to these protocols, which are meant to ensure our collective safety and help keep Johns Hopkins campuses open. Sincerely, Fred Bronstein Dean

Dear Peabody Students, I am pleased to inform you that the practice room scheduler is now live and open for reservations starting on Monday, August 31, 2020. I’ve attached detailed instructions on how to access ArtsVision and book a practice room here, which are also available on the Concert Office webpage, linked below. PLEASE NOTE: You must have a reservation to access the building. Reservations must be made at least two hours in advance. Please make sure to read through the health and safety guidelines carefully. Failure to comply may result in loss of access to the practice rooms. PRACTICE ROOM BOOKING INFORMATION Please don’t hesitate to reach out if you have any questions at all! Thanks, Anna Anna Harris, Concert Office Manager The Peabody Institute of The Johns Hopkins University One East Mt. Vernon Place Baltimore, MD 21202

Dear Peabody students:

As we write to you today, our hope is that you continue to progress in your studies, while remaining safe along with family and friends. We have been inspired by your embracing the challenges posed by COVID-19 along with our faculty and administrative team.

We know that although we are just a few weeks into the fall semester, you are beginning to ask and wonder about what will happen this spring. As you well know, the public health situation remains changeable. At the same time, we are learning more every day about how we can best keep ourselves and those around us safe while ensuring you can successfully pursue your academic and artistic goals. We have important decisions ahead of us as we look to the spring semester. While we cannot tell you today exactly what shape that decision will take, we can tell how we are thinking about this.

Ideally, we would like to offer everyone who wants to be on campus in-person, and who is able to get to campus, the opportunity to do so, and we are actively preparing for that possibility even as we determine whether it can be accomplished safely. At the same time, if the public health situation requires it, we will continue to hold all classes and lessons virtually for the rest of the year.

Between those two possibilities, there are a range of options that could include bringing certain activities back to campus, such as performing and applied related studies, much as we had planned for the fall before the acceleration of COVID-19. We are continuing to assess and prioritize which activities can most immediately benefit from a return to campus. We are also evaluating possible changes to the spring academic calendar such as a later start to the term and the elimination of spring break and/or audition week, based on potential for increased health risks due to seasonal flu and travel.

We are committed to keeping you informed of our progress with regular updates about the planning process and any interim decisions as they are made. We are also committed to providing you with a plan by Thanksgiving, if not sooner, with the caveat  that we will re-evaluate the public health conditions as we approach the start of the semester and will not hesitate to change course if a surge in cases locally or nationally threatens the safety of our community.

As we develop our plans, there are things we know for sure.

Most importantly, the health and safety of our community is paramount, encompassing our students, faculty, staff and the City of Baltimore. We will rely on the expertise of Johns Hopkins’ world-class public health and medical experts to guide our decisions. We will carefully monitor through JHU a number of metrics related to the spread of COVID-19 in our area and around the country, including data-driven forecasting, although there is no single factor determinative of our ultimate decisions.

With our core principles in place, we will include several approaches in our planning:

  • We will listen closely to our faculty, staff, students and their families to understand their wishes and priorities for the spring semester. 
  • If and when we are able to bring students back on campus, we will be fully prepared for all the necessary aspects of our operations, including broad-based COVID testing, physical distancing in classrooms and studios, requirements for self-reporting symptoms, and housing and dining approaches that reduce risk.
  • We will ensure a high-quality experience both virtually and in person. In addition, we remain committed to delivering our programs remotely to students unable to return to campus this spring.
  • We will closely monitor peer conservatories and fellow higher education institutions to learn all we can about best practices and challenges related to containing the spread of COVID-19 on campus that others are learning throughout this fall.

With these guidelines in place, and your continuing feedback, our planning task force, comprised of faculty, staff, and students, is determining the best path forward. We welcome your input through our online feedback form and your participation in town halls. You can always stay informed through JHU’s Coronavirus Information website.

Most of all, we thank you for your patience and dedication as we navigate many complex issues in a changing landscape. We look forward to being in touch as planning continues. For now, please be well and stay safe.

Sincerely,

Fred Bronstein
Dean

Townsend Plant
Associate Dean for Enrollment Management & Student Life

Dear Peabody faculty, staff, and students,

President Daniels‚Äô recent update on the pandemic-related financial challenges facing the university presents a clear-eyed overview of where we stand as a university community. Its primary theme ‚Äď that the lingering strain and uncertainty caused by COVID-19 will require continued caution in our financial response ‚Äď holds true for Peabody as well.

Thanks to our community‚Äôs hard work on our five-year plan to ensure the Institute‚Äôs long-term impact and financial stability, Peabody had been on target to break even in the current 2021 fiscal year (July 1, 2020-June 30, 2021). While our thoughtful planning and relatively strong financial position coming into the pandemic has allowed us to withstand the initial impact, FY21 ‚Äď the first full year affected by COVID-19 ‚Äď remains challenging.

To recap, in FY20 (the year that ended on June 30), Peabody posted a loss of $2.4 million, on a budgeted deficit of $2.1 million, down from Peabody’s prior year deficit of $2.9 million. This year (FY21), Peabody was on track, pre-COVID, to achieving the first positive bottom line in our plan; however, the impact of COVID, and specifically our decision to reduce tuition 10 percent this fall for all students, resulted in re-budgeting FY21 to include a planned loss of $3.7 million. Now, with higher-than-expected enrollment and additional support from the university to help offset the tuition reduction, we do expect to improve upon this budgeted deficit, although many challenges remain and will continue to drive a cautious fiscal approach this year.

As I mentioned in my most recent note to faculty and staff on this topic, we do not foresee the need to implement additional significant financial austerity measures, such as furloughs or compensation reductions, this year, beyond those actions which have already been taken. In fact, along with the university, Peabody plans to reverse the merit increase and promotions freezes and to fully restore retirement contributions in FY22 (which begins next July), while continuing to explore the ability to loosen austerity measures sooner than that, if conditions improve more than expected.

At the same time, and with the support of the university, Peabody has worked to mitigate the impact of the pandemic on our community, including by increasing financial aid for students whose family situations have changed due to the pandemic, and investing in technology and infrastructure to improve our teaching operations both during and after this period of remote learning. In addition, in alignment with the vision outlined in the Breakthrough Plan 2024, and as we begin to consider the long-term impact of COVID-19 on artists and arts institutions, we continue to prudently invest in programs and initiatives that will underpin Peabody’s academic and financial health as we emerge from this crisis. This will ensure that Peabody maintains the position of leadership it has carved out in preparing a diverse and flexible group musicians and dancers for the constantly evolving landscape that is the professional world today.

As we work through the financial and other challenges facing the Institute during these times, I remain grateful to each of you for your continued commitment to Peabody and to our educational mission. I will continue to be in touch with updates. Please stay safe and be well.

Sincerely,

Fred Bronstein Dean

Dear Johns Hopkins Community: 

We write today to share news about our spring semester. With a mix of cautious optimism, careful preparation, and strong desire to convene on our campuses, we are planning to resume in-person, on-campus academic and residential offerings this spring to the greatest extent possible.  

Our plans are shaped by your tremendous efforts to date to carry out our education, research, and clinical missions safely, as well as the guidance of public health experts at Johns Hopkins and nationally, and the best practices of those peer institutions that have successfully returned to campus this fall. They rest on continued strict adherence to public health guidelines, significant de-densification of our facilities, and a widening of our testing program and requirements.

Like so many of you, we also are watching closely the pandemic‚Äôs trends as we head into the high-travel holiday, winter, and flu seasons and see the continued strain of COVID around the country and the world. We will continue to monitor its course and impact on our communities as we prepare‚ÄĒwith hope, determination, and prudence‚ÄĒto come together this spring, and we will confirm in January, if not sooner, whether our plans can be carried out safely based on the public health conditions at that time.¬†

Importantly, our return is predicated upon our continued dedication to keeping one another and the broader Baltimore community safe and healthy. Our experiences so far suggest that we can accomplish both aims; to date we have experienced no known COVID transmissions in our reopened research labs and no significant outbreaks among the thousands of our students who have been in Baltimore. 

Our students led the way this fall in creating a social compact of mutual responsibility for abiding by public health guidelines, and our low transmission rate is a testament to their commitment. As we look to significantly expand our activities for the spring, we will be asking the entire university community to join this compact. 

As always, we want to hear your feedback and answer any questions you may have, including via our online feedback portal and in our regular town halls. We welcome all faculty, students, and staff to a Spring Planning town hall at 11:30 a.m. on Monday, Nov. 9. An additional town hall focused on undergraduates will be held at 4 p.m on Wednesday, Nov. 4. 

Full details about our spring plans will be provided in early December in an updated JHU Return to Campus Guide. We will also update the community regularly on our Coronavirus Information website. In the meantime, below are the key elements of our plans.    

Academic Schedule and Classes

As long as the public health situation allows, undergraduate students will be permitted, but not required, to return to campus for classes and research activities for the spring semester. Most of our graduate divisions are also planning to resume some portion of their own on-campus activities and will provide more details to their schools in the coming days.  

Faculty and students will continue to have flexibility and choice about class modalities, and students who do not return to campus will have options for continuing their academic progress remotely. Course offerings will include a mix of in-person and online/remote classes. On-campus instruction will be conducted in classrooms prepared for distancing, ensuring at least 6 feet between students and instructors. Undergraduate tuition for the spring semester will be at the standard full-time rate of $28,505, which is already reflected in financial aid awards.

We are also modifying our academic calendar to remove spring break owing to public health concerns associated with travel. Classes will start on January 25 as originally planned, but the weeklong spring break (March 22‚Äď26) will be replaced with five break days throughout the semester. Registration details will be forthcoming from each school this week.¬†

COVID Testing and Other Health and Safety Protocols 

We will continue to require strict adherence to proven public health protocols, including masking, physical distancing, and handwashing. In addition, we will be significantly expanding our current COVID testing program.  

Across Johns Hopkins University, testing will be available to all, and required of many, starting in January.

Testing protocols 

  • Those who are experiencing COVID symptoms or who may have been exposed to someone with the COVID virus should call the Johns Hopkins COVID Call Center (833-546-7546).
  • Optional free testing will be available on a weekly basis for all asymptomatic affiliates who are on campus. ¬†
  • Testing will be required twice weekly for all undergraduates living on or off campus in the Baltimore area.¬†
  • Testing will be required at least once weekly for faculty, staff, and graduate students who are participating in or directly supporting in-person, on-campus classes (with exceptions for clinically based instruction) or who are regularly exposed to undergraduates.
  • The divisions may also designate for required testing any faculty, staff, or graduate students who are deemed to have a heightened risk of exposure.
  • Testing will be available and/or required for faculty, staff, and students who are asked to quarantine due to exposure on campus, or who were working or learning in the same enclosed space (e.g., classroom or lab) at the same time as someone who tests positive.
  • Testing will be available and/or required for our contract workers, vendors, and necessary visitors.
  • More information and detailed guidelines for testing will be available in December, including test collection locations on all campuses and instructions for how to make testing appointments and receive test results.

General Health and Safety Protocols 

  • All affiliates coming to campus will be required to use the ProDensity app for test results and to monitor symptoms before being cleared to be on campus.¬†
  • The university will continue the de-densification of classrooms, labs, libraries, research facilities, dining halls, and other common areas.¬†
  • Gatherings of more than 10 people will be prohibited on campus and for students living off campus.
  • We will continue our practice of enhanced cleaning, particularly in high-touch areas, as well as increased air exchange and filtration 24/7 in all facilities.¬†

As we proceed throughout the fall and into the spring, you will see an increasing number of university Safety Ambassadors on campus to provide information on our health and safety measures and ensure adherence to established health protocols, including required use of ProDensity. 

Undergraduate Housing

In all, we expect to have 1,200 undergraduates returning to campus in addition to the 2,000 currently residing in Baltimore, primarily in Charles Village. All first-year students who choose to come to campus will be housed in the dorms. Given the results of a recent student survey, we are optimistic that we also will be able to accommodate all second-year students who expressed an interest in living in JHU housing. Those second-year students who wish to live off campus may do so, and our student affairs team is here to provide housing support. 

On-campus residential options will reflect reduced density (single occupancy bedrooms with limited sharing of bathroom facilities), and we are setting aside a substantial number of quarantine and isolation accommodations for residential students as well as isolation accommodations for any undergraduates living off campus who need them.  

Gradual Restart of Campus Operations 

The phased restart of campus operations has been underway for some time, with labs and clinical operations leading the way, and will be expanding gradually over the next several months. Earlier this week, we announced an increase in the allowable density for labs, libraries, and some offices, based on demonstrated need, effective November 1, which brings us on par with peers and will allow for the further resumption of research. For more detailed information, please look for a communication from your school and refer to the research resumption guidelines. 

For the most part, staff who are currently working remotely will continue to do so in order to keep density low on our campuses. Only those needed on campus to support in-person research and academic activities will return. Divisional- and department-specific plans for staff are being developed now, and managers will provide adequate notice to those staff who should return. Human Resources stands ready to support anyone who requires accommodations or adjustments. 

For now, all other Phase 1 guidelines remain in effect. These include our current protocols and policies on testing, travel, visitors, and gatherings and events, outlined in our Return to Campus Guidance. 

Looking Ahead Safely 

While the pandemic continues its prolonged and uncertain path, we are guided by our foundational commitment to put health and safety first. In our decision making, we will continue to examine a matrix of factors and data, and we are grateful for the frequent and ongoing input of our public health experts and our faculty and student advisory bodies, including the University Pandemic Academic Advisory Committee, the Health Advisory Group, and the Student Advisory Committee. We will also continue to look to our peers for advice and best practices even as we develop plans that serve the unique needs of Johns Hopkins and Baltimore. 

The fall semester has been an extraordinarily strong and productive one despite the odds. We have all of you to thank for making it so, and we will be counting on your commitment to one another and to those we live, learn, and work alongside in Baltimore as we look forward to a safe and successful return to campus this spring. 

Sincerely, 

Ronald J. Daniels 
President

Sunil Kumar 
Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs

Mary Miller
Interim Senior Vice President for Finance and Administration

Dear Peabody students:

As the university continues its planning process for the spring semester, I write to you today with the latest news on our related plans for Peabody. As always, our plans are driven first and foremost by considerations for the health and safety of our community; shaped by consultation with Johns Hopkins’ world-class public health and medical experts, with reference to best practices that have proven successful among JHU and Peabody peer institutions; and informed by careful monitoring of metrics related to the spread of COVID-19 in our area and around the country.

While we are hopeful that the plans outlined below will materialize as envisioned, a final determination about whether public health conditions will allow us to safely carry out our plans will be made in early January, if not sooner. Until then, we will continue with careful planning under the full knowledge that plans are subject to change.  And we will continue to keep you informed with additional details in the weeks to come. 

We know that many of you are eager to return to campus, particularly for your lessons and other applied areas of your studies as performing artists. With that in mind, we are planning a hybrid semester that offers as much in-person instruction as is feasible, while continuing the remote experience across various areas of instruction, and for those unable to return to campus.

The success of our return-to-campus plan depends on the communitywide understanding that safety is a shared responsibility. Many of you have demonstrated that commitment to one another’s safety through your actions and agreement with the student social compact this fall. With a university-wide social compact expected for spring alongside a robust COVID-19 testing program, I am confident that every member of the Peabody community will do their part to keep each other safe and healthy as we move forward.

ACADEMICS and TUITION

The core of the in-person experience for spring will focus on performance-related activities and include applied lessons, chamber music and other ensembles, and technique courses, with strict adherence to distancing and room density protocols, and to the extent that individual faculty circumstances safely allow. Most academic courses will remain in a remote format in order to limit larger gatherings and minimize density on campus; all students, whether on campus or not, will take these courses remotely.

All Peabody Conservatory students in all programs, both undergraduate and graduate, are invited to return to campus under this hybrid plan for the spring semester. Students who either choose to remain at home or for whom traveling to Peabody is not possible can continue to pursue a completely remote program.

With this return to campus, tuition will adhere to the originally published 2020-21 rates for the spring semester. At the same time, recognizing that many students and families have struggled with the financial impacts of the pandemic, which led to our decision to provide a one-time reduction in tuition for the fall semester as part of a package of assistance, we are committed to continuing to invest in enhanced financial aid and additional support where needed.

Due to public health concerns associated with travel, the academic calendar will be modified. As at Homewood, classes will start on January 25 as originally planned, but the week-long Spring Break will be replaced with five break days interspersed throughout the second half of the semester. Audition Week will take place as planned (February 14-19); large ensemble and chamber music activities will continue throughout Audition Week and current students who have returned to campus will be expected to remain on campus. Registration for spring classes will take place November 13-20. The courses will appear in SIS approximately five days in advance; however, an earlier draft of the course schedule will be available on the Registrar’s website.

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS

Unfortunately, SEVP/DHS has not yet established guidelines for international students for the spring 2021 semester. We are working closely with the Office of International Services and will update international students as soon as possible. If SEVP issues a continuation of their fall 2020 guidance, new international students can enter the U.S. to pursue their program as long as the program is not 100% online and the student is able to take a course load that is not 100% online. New students must take at least one in-person course for spring 2021. Assuming SEVP extends the fall guidance to spring 2021, continuing students would be able to enter or remain in the United States enrolled in a hybrid format or take a fully online course load.

Many countries still have travel restrictions and/or suspended consulate activity, which may limit the ability of international students to travel to the U.S. As with the fall, we will continue to provide the highest quality experience remotely for those unable to be on campus and our faculty and staff are ready to support you in every way possible should you need or elect to pursue your program completely online. International students with questions should contact the JHU Office of International Students at 667-208-7001, or at ois@jhu.edu.

HOUSING and DINING

In order to safely welcome students back to campus life and enhance everyone’s ability to observe social distancing guidelines, all student residential rooms will be single-occupancy for the spring semester, with limited and controlled sharing of bathroom facilities.

Freshmen will receive priority for on-campus housing, and sophomores are released from the residency requirement. Sophomores with concerns about securing off-campus housing should be in touch with Student Affairs. 

Peabody’s dining plan for the spring is focused on a grab-and-go model for students living in Peabody housing.

In addition, appropriate spaces are being identified and set aside for isolation and quarantine protocols should those become necessary.

HEALTH AND SAFETY PROTOCOLS

We will continue to require strict adherence to proven public safety protocols including masking, physical distancing, and handwashing. For instrument-specific guidance around studio lessons and ensemble classes, please read the Conservatory’s detailed return-to-campus guidance for applied instruction at peabody.jhu.edu/campusguidance. These protocols have been developed with input from the university’s leading health experts to ensure the safety of our community. 

In addition, the University will be significantly expanding its current COVID-19 testing program. Testing will be available to all, and required of many, on a weekly basis beginning in January, with the potential to increase or expand required testing based on real-time positivity rates, participation rates, and public health conditions in Maryland and D.C.

Testing protocols at Peabody will include the collection and testing of saliva samples on Peabody’s Mt. Vernon campus as follows:

  • Those who are experiencing COVID symptoms or who may have been exposed to someone with the COVID virus should call the Johns Hopkins COVID Call Center (833-546-7546).
  • Twice weekly mandatory testing of all undergraduates living on and off campus.
  • Once-weekly mandatory testing for all graduate students in Baltimore, and for faculty and staff who are working on campus or participating in or directly supporting in-person on-campus classes, or who are otherwise student-facing.
  • Peabody may also designate for required testing any faculty and staff who are deemed to have a heightened risk of exposure.
  • Optional, free testing will be available on a weekly basis for all asymptomatic affiliates who are on campus.
  • Testing will also be available and/or required for our contract workers, vendors, and necessary visitors.

Rigorous adherence to this testing schedule and cooperation with contact tracing will be required and is crucial to our ability to make sure the spread of COVID in our community is known and limited. More information and detailed guidelines for testing will be available in December, including test collection locations on all campuses and instructions for how to make testing appointments and receive test results.

Daily health monitoring using ProDensity will continue to be required for those on campus. Please note that influenza vaccination is also required for all affiliates who will be on campus, starting November 20.

Face coverings will be required indoors and outdoors, without exception. In those instructional situations where the Conservatory’s commitment to quality education makes masking impossible, alternative protective measures will be in place. Signage will reinforce the need to remain physically distant from each other, and no gatherings of more than 10 people will be allowed. You may see safety ambassadors on campus; their job is to provide information on our health and safety measures and ensure adherence to established health protocols.

With the guidance of JHU public health professionals, we are ensuring that common areas and teaching spaces are cleaned and disinfected appropriately with time between scheduled activities for rooms to rest. The practice room reservation system introduced this fall will continue to be in place for individual practice and for small, masked chamber groups.

Non-essential travel outside of the greater Baltimore area is strongly discouraged for students at any time. Any essential or emergency travel must be registered with Student Affairs so students can receive support for appropriate self-quarantine and testing upon return to Baltimore/campus. Depending on the circumstances of travel, additional testing and quarantine may be required.

MOVING FORWARD

We will continue to work out the details of our plans and are committed to keeping you informed and answering your many questions in the weeks ahead. Your feedback is critical to our planning efforts. Your input through our online feedback form and your participation in upcoming town halls will provide valuable input alongside expert guidance and key data as we shape the spring semester.

Above all, I am grateful for and inspired by the commitment each of you has made to Peabody, as together we have navigated this very unusual fall semester. It has not been without its challenges, but there is much to be proud of in the work you have done, the teaching and learning that has transpired, and the art you have created ‚Äď and even more to look forward to as we plan with optimism to return to campus in the spring.

Sincerely,

Fred Bronstein
Dean

 
Dear Faculty, Students, and Staff, 

We are watching with concern the continued high level of COVID cases locally and nationally and anticipate further increases related to holiday travel and gatherings. Within our own community, we are seeing a significant rise in cases as well, among students, faculty, and staff. Our case-by-case investigations have shown that most have been the result of non-Hopkins/off-campus transmission, but last week we reported to the state a cluster of six positive cases within a specific nonlaboratory, nonclinical workplace on the Homewood campus, and we will be tightening precautions within that unit to ensure our employees’ safety. 

Even amid these troubling developments, we are continuing to prepare for the increase in on-campus activity for the spring semester that we announced in November. We have learned a great deal in the last few months about how to maintain health and safety in a campus environment during the COVID pandemic‚ÄĒindeed, we still have not detected transmission within our research labs, even as we have increased the level of activity within them over the course of the fall‚ÄĒand we remain cautiously optimistic that we can resume more in-person activity in late January. We are not alone; some of our peers have also recently announced plans for increased on-campus activity in the spring, and those that already had significant on-campus activity in the fall are generally remaining in that posture. ¬†

Public health is our top priority, and as we have indicated before, we will not hesitate to change plans if necessary to keep our community safe. We remain committed to making a final determination about the spring semester no later than early January, but we also know that if we do not continue our focused planning and preparations for a return to campus, we will foreclose the possibility of reopening. 

To that end, we are making final refinements to our detailed return to campus guidance, which we anticipate publishing in mid-December. We are moving forward with efforts to increase our asymptomatic testing capacity, and making alterations to our campuses to safely accommodate more faculty, staff, and students:  

  • Testing for asymptomatic faculty, staff, and trainees in Johns Hopkins Medicine will be available beginning the week of Dec. 14.¬†We anticipate that we will begin to offer, at locations on each campus, asymptomatic testing for Johns Hopkins University faculty, staff, and students who will be on campus in early January.
  • A committee of students, faculty, and staff has been working to expand this fall‚Äôs student compact¬†to include all campus constituencies in a mutual commitment to taking the necessary steps to keep our community safe. We plan a campaign in support of the compact in January.¬†
  • Work is underway to expand our campus COVID dashboard¬†to include more metrics, including a breakdown of positive and negative tests by division.¬†
  • On the Homewood campus, we are erecting a 9,000-square-foot structure on the Freshman Quad to provide appropriately ventilated, de-densified, and climate-controlled space for studying and other activities. ¬†

During the next few weeks, we will be watching a variety of key public health metrics locally and nationally, and we will consult frequently with our Health Advisory Group, a panel of Johns Hopkins University’s foremost experts in the emerging science of COVID. We are also closely monitoring the encouraging news about the development of COVID vaccines, but because they are unlikely to be ready for mass distribution until the second quarter of 2021, they do not factor into our immediate plans for the spring semester. 

During the next few weeks, as you make your own plans for the spring, there are a few things we ask you to bear in mind: 

  • We are actively exploring alternative scenarios for increased activity in the spring, even if conditions do not allow us to continue with our current plans. Options include a delay in increased in-person activity or additional limitations on in-person coursework and other activities, with public health and academic needs driving our considerations.¬†
  • Even if we change our spring semester plans, we will still offer expanded asymptomatic testing for JHU affiliates who will be on campus.¬†
  • Regardless of the level of in-person activity we are able to conduct, alternatives to on-campus presence will remain for faculty and students this spring.¬†
  • Students who cannot or do not wish to return to campus will be given opportunities to continue making academic progress remotely.¬†
  • Faculty and staff members who can work remotely will continue to do so until further notice. The university offers accommodations and adjustments as warranted to those for whom in-person work presents extra risks to themselves or others.¬†

Above all, we ask you to take care of your own health and that of your family and friends. The most important thing we can all do to create the conditions for a safe return is to follow the guidance of the JHNeedsU campaign: Wear a face covering, maintain physical distance, wash hands frequently, and monitor yourself for possible COVID symptoms. During the holiday season, it is especially important to avoid large gatherings and unnecessary travel. 

As this difficult year comes to a close, we are mindful of the terrible toll COVID has taken on our communities, but we are also proud of the leading role Johns Hopkins University has played in the local, national, and global response to the pandemic. It is in that spirit of innovation and determination, always with data and science as our guides, that we move forward in hopes of coming together again in person as a Johns Hopkins community this spring. 

Stay safe and be well, 

Stephen Gange
Professor and Executive Vice Provost for Academic Affairs

Jane Schlegel
Vice President and Chief Administrative Officer

Dear Peabody students, faculty, and staff: 

With the fall semester quickly drawing to a close, I write with a brief update on plans for spring semester as of today. You will recall from the message I sent in early November that we are planning for a hybrid return to campus for the spring semester, with a goal of bringing as much of the performance-related activities back to campus as possible, even as classroom-based courses remain online to minimize density on campus.  

In close consultation with the leadership and public health experts at Johns Hopkins University, we continue to work towards that goal, while keeping the health and safety of our community first and foremost in our planning. As we vigilantly monitor the trajectory of the pandemic, we have made alternative plans that include a more gradual return to on-campus activity, in the event that the public health situation does not allow for a hybrid return at the start of the semester. While we are still planning today to begin hybrid activities on January 25th, we are also considering an option to begin the semester remotely with limited on-campus activity in January, carefully ramping up in-person activities to achieve full hybrid operations after Audition Week.  

In the event of a delayed start to in-person activities, the move-in date for on-campus residents would occur shortly before the start of in-person instruction (dates TBD), and room and board charges would be prorated. To accommodate this, we have delayed Spring 2021 billing; spring semester charges will be viewable online on January 14 with payment due by February 12. 

We remain committed to making a final determination about spring semester instruction by early January. As we weigh the factors that will guide that decision, there are several things we know to be true: 

  • Robust testing protocols will be in place when students and faculty return to campus, no matter when that happens.¬†¬†
  • Regardless of the level of in-person activity we are able to conduct, alternatives to on-campus presence will remain for students this spring.¬†¬†
  • Some members of the faculty will not be able to be on campus every week due to virus-related restrictions and will continue to teach remotely.¬†
  • Students who cannot or do not wish to return to campus will be able to continue and remain fully on track with their programs remotely.¬†

Of course, in order for any of these plans to be successful, we will depend on every member of the community adhering to proven public safety precautions including masking, handwashing, and physical distancing. Please take a few moments to familiarize yourself with the detailed guidance for applied Conservatory instruction ahead of any return to campus. 

While there are still challenges ahead of us, there are many reasons to be optimistic about the coming year, not least this week’s distribution of the first COVID-19 vaccine. As we continue to monitor the data, I am truly hopeful that we will be able to come together again in the spring semester for the first time in many months, begin a return to normal activities, and enjoy once again life on our Mt. Vernon campus. I know we all look forward to that time. For now, I wish you a peaceful and safe winter break. 

Sincerely, 

Fred Bronstein 

Dean 

Dear Faculty, Students, and Staff, 

Today, we share with you our promised plans for an expanded on-campus experience in the spring semester and the policies and procedures we believe are necessary to ensure a safe and healthy return to in-person classes and other activities. We are mindful of the rising number of COVID-19 cases in our Baltimore community and nationally at present. As we indicated previously, we will make a final determination about an expanded return to our campuses in the first week of January, but in preparation, we have worked to ready ourselves for this next phase of reopening with cautious optimism. 


Our planning efforts are founded on the understanding that every member of our community shares a mutual responsibility to keep each other and our neighbors safe. The guide‚ÄĒwhich is presented in draft as it is not yet effective‚ÄĒincludes information about refinements to the university‚Äôs policies, such as expanded COVID testing and a new social compact. Developed by a cross-divisional committee of faculty, staff, and students, the compact embodies the principles we hope every member of the Hopkins community will affirm and dedicate themselves to following.¬†

Moving to an expanded operating posture at the appropriate time is a challenge that will require the help of every member of our community, but our experience so far gives us confidence that it is one we can meet. Our success in resuming research and clinical operations shows that with careful preparation and diligent adherence to our guidelines, we can safely conduct in-person activities in furtherance of our mission even amid the pandemic.  

We will put your health and that of our Baltimore neighbors first, and if we must change our plans to maintain our community’s safety, we will not hesitate to do so. But as we continue to monitor the public health trends, we share these guidelines, in their draft form, with the hope that you will review them and offer your feedback before they are finalized in January. Highlights of the guidelines are below, and the full document can be found on covidinfo.jhu.edu.

We wish to thank the many faculty, staff, and students who have contributed to the development of these guidelines, including our colleagues and students who continue to serve on the University Pandemic Academic Advisory Committee, the Student Advisory Committee, and the Health Advisory Group. 

Above all, stay safe this holiday season. 

Stephen Gange
Professor and Executive Vice Provost for Academic Affairs  

Jane Schlegel
Vice President and Chief Administrative Officer  

Health and safety with expanded COVID testing 

The Phase 2 health and safety guidelines maintain most elements of our Phase 1 policies, including mandatory mask-wearing on campus (both indoors and outside), limits on gatherings, and required daily health checks through Prodensity for those who will be on campus. Broad-scale COVID testing is a new element of the guidelines, which include: 

  • Mandatory twice-weekly testing for undergraduates who are in Baltimore, regardless of whether they will be on campus.¬†
  • Mandatory once-weekly testing for faculty, staff, graduate students, trainees, and postdocs (1) participating in or directly supporting in-person, on-campus classes (with exceptions for clinically based instruction) or (2) regularly exposed to undergraduates. Schools, centers, and divisions may require more frequent testing for their populations. Testing frequency may be increased to two times per week, based on public health conditions.¬†
  • Nine testing locations will be established across all Baltimore and Washington campuses. Details, including hours of operation, will be posted on covidinfo.jhu.edu.¬†
  • Affiliates will use the MyChart app or website to schedule testing appointments and receive results.¬†

Use of campus facilities 

A move to Phase 2 allows for more activity on campus, including low-density in-person instruction and a residential program for undergraduates. Presence on campus is not required for students, and all programs will have an online option. Major elements of Phase 2 include: 

  • Undergraduate residence halls will be open with limited capacity. All students will have their own bedrooms, and sharing of bathroom facilities will be limited. Unless public health conditions change, only residents of the building will be allowed to enter. Students will not be permitted to enter another student‚Äôs bedroom.¬†
  • Multiple dining facilities will be available to students, faculty, and staff of the Homewood campus, including FFC, Nolan‚Äôs, Levering, and Charles Street Market. Additional dining locations will open as the campus recovery plan progresses. All facilities will feature grab-and-go service unless public health guidance allows for limited seating. In addition, food delivery will be provided to students in quarantine and/or isolation housing.¬†
  • A temporary structure will be built on the Homewood Freshman Quad to provide space for study and/or student activities.¬† ¬†
  • In-person instruction will take place in de-densified classrooms with appropriate physical distancing requirements.¬†
  • Use of research labs and libraries will continue according to current restrictions.¬†
  • The Ralph S. O‚ÄôConnor Recreation Center on the Homewood campus and the Cooley Center at East Baltimore will operate with limited capacity and offerings.¬†
  • Only faculty and staff who are teaching, performing research, providing clinical services, or are required for campus operations should work on campus until further notice. All other faculty and staff will continue to work from home throughout the spring semester. Campus events will remain limited.¬†

Accommodations and adjustments for vulnerable employees 

During Phase 2, more faculty and staff will return to campus to support on-campus teaching and research, but we recognize that some members of our community face a greater risk from COVID than others. We encourage faculty, postdoctoral fellows, and staff members who are asked to return to work on site at this time and who have concerns about their individual circumstances to engage with the Office of Institutional Equity or Central Human Resources about the process for seeking a reasonable accommodation or work adjustments. For further information or assistance with accommodations, please refer to the guide or check here for more details. 

Support for JHU affiliates 

Working and studying during the pandemic has created a host of new pressures and stresses, and the university has established or strengthened a number of programs to help during this difficult time.  

  • Information on mental health and well-being supports for students is available here¬†and for employees here.
  • The university has significantly expanded its resources to help affiliates find and pay for appropriate dependent care. Details are available here.¬†

For full details of our return-to-campus plans, please see the full guide here. 

Key dates 

  • January 4: Virtual Homewood intersession begins¬†
  • Week of January 4: Announcement of plans for spring semester based on public health assessment¬†
  • January 14: Required asymptomatic testing begins for all undergraduates in Baltimore¬†
  • January 15: Homewood intersession ends¬†
  • January 25: First day of spring semester classes¬†
  • Spring break is replaced by five days off during the semester‚ÄĒMarch 22 and 30, and April 14, 20, and 30¬†
  • May 3-4; 5-13: Undergraduate reading and exam period¬†
  • May 27: University Commencement¬†

Dear Students,

Last week, the university released its draft guidelines for expanded in-person activities once we enter Phase 2 of our COVID pandemic response, and Dean Bronstein sent a December 17 message reiterating Peabody’s Plans. While the final decision regarding Phase 2 will occur during the first week of January (further details about the decision-making process are available on the university’s COVID info site), we continue to plan to welcome students back to campus for the spring 2021 semester for as many performance-related activities as possible, even as classroom-based courses remain online to minimize density on campus.

We have missed seeing you in person and are eagerly awaiting those of you who will be returning to campus. But first and foremost, our mutual responsibility is to keep our Peabody and Baltimore communities safe and healthy. Below is some information to help you do so.

Things to Do Before You Travel

  • Download the ProDensity App and familiarize yourself with it. This is the required tool for recording your daily health checks and verifying compliance with testing so that you can gain access to campus. You can access the ProDensity app here.
  • Get your required flu vaccine. You will not be permitted on campus if you have not had your flu vaccine. If you haven‚Äôt already done so, get your flu vaccine and submit documentation to the university if you did not use the Walgreens voucher.

There can be a delay between receiving your flu shot and having the system confirm it, so it is very important to get this task done well before the semester starts and to keep receipt of the vaccine. Additionally, getting vaccinated sooner rather than later offers protection for you given that flu season has already started. Even if you get your shot at Walgreens, we advise that you get a receipt so that you can upload it yourself here. This can expedite the verification that you received the required flu vaccine in ProDensity.

For students unable to access flu shots in their current locations, particularly international students, there will be flu shot clinics in January.

If you require a medical or religious exemption for the flu vaccine, refer to this FAQ page for details.

  • Confirm your Emergency Contact information and Local Address in SIS. Students are required to enter their current local address and an emergency contact that is within a 100-mile radius of campus.
  • Review Student Health Plan coverage before Wednesday, January 20, 2021. If you waived coverage for the fall 2020 semester and your current health plan does not provide coverage in the Baltimore area or you are on a J1 or F1 visa, you will be required to enroll in the Student Health Plan for the spring if you plan to be in Maryland. You must make any updates by January 20, or waivers will automatically roll over to the spring 2021 semester, and university health insurance benefits willnot be available. Request enrollment in the Student Health Benefits plan using¬†our contact formby Wednesday, January 20, 2021.

Information on the plan and associated costs can be found on the JHU student benefits website. Please reach out to the registrar’s office with any questions about the Student Health Plan and any relevant waivers.

  • We strongly recommend you obtain a COVID Nucleic Acid Test (NAT/PCR) test at least 72 hoursprior to arriving on campus or in Baltimore in accordance with current Maryland state guidance. While this is a recommendation and not currently a requirement, we are recommending it in the strongest possible terms to help protect the safety of the Hopkins and Baltimore communities.

To find a site to get tested, visit this state-by-state index of community-based testing sites (which includes retail pharmacies) created by the Department of Health and Human Services.

If you need financial assistance with the cost of the test, you may submit an appeal to the Peabody Office of Financial Aid by contacting peabodyfinaid@jhu.edu. You will need to attach a receipt or price quote for the test. All requests will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis and prioritized based on level of financial need. If approved, funds will be applied to your student account.

  • Do not travel if you are symptomatic or recently tested positive.

If you test positive, you should not travel until you have isolated for at least 10 days and are symptom free. If you test positive before arriving on campus, please reach out to the Student Health and Wellness Center (SHWC) to let them know. This information will allow SHWC staff to better manage your eventual arrival to campus.

  • If you have tested positive for COVID within 90 days before returning to campus, are symptom free, and have completed your isolation period, email documentation of your test results to the SHWC at healthforms@jhu.edu. People can continue to test positive for up to 3 months after diagnosis and not be infectious to others. If you do not email this information to SHWC in advance of your arrival on campus, you will need to present it in person at move-in if you‚Äôre living on campus. Students living off campus will need to present it at their first testing appointment. Since we are requiring students to be tested upon arrival, you will most likely test positive again and need to show documentation of the date of your positive test result and attest to the fact that you have completed your isolation period to avoid having to isolate again.
  • For any students new to Peabody and JHU, please make sure you have completed and submitted all your other pre-entrance health form requirements prior to arrival on campus. Failure to do socan delay your move-in process if we do not have a completed pre-entrance health form and proof of required vaccines.

Arrival in Baltimore for Students Living on Campus

Residential students will be tested upon arrival before they can move into their assigned room. Students must quarantine in their rooms until they receive a negative test result which is usually within 24 hours. During this quarantine period, students should only leave their room to pick up meals at the designated area. If a student receives a positive test, they will be notified by SHWC and instructed on next steps.

Residential students will need to get their second weekly test 48 hours after their arrival test. Students should receive two COVID tests prior to the start of classes. You will receive a follow-up communication in January on how to sign-up for your regular twice-a-week mandatory testing.

Additionally, students who are living in residence halls will receive a separate communication from Residential Life about move-in. Watch your inbox for this important message.

Arrival in Baltimore for Students Living Off Campus

Starting on January 11, 2021, students living off campus must start their twice-a-week, mandatory testing immediately upon their return to Baltimore. Students must receive at least two COVID tests that are 48 hours apart prior to the start of classes. Please plan your travel accordingly so you can receive your first test no later than January 21. You will receive a follow-up communication in January on how to sign up for your regular twice-a-week mandatory testing. Peabody‚Äôs testing location will be Maestro‚Äôs and hours of operation will be Monday through Friday, 10 am ‚Äď 2 pm.

If you arrive in Baltimore earlier than January 11, asymptomatic COVID testing will not yet be available. Asymptomatic testing is an important tool to help us detect COVID cases early and limit the virus’ spread, but it is not a substitute for the primary prevention measures we have observed since the beginning of the pandemic. We urge you to continue to practice mask wearing, physical distancing, symptom monitoring and hand washing after our mandatory testing program takes effect.

What Isolation and Quarantine Plans Will Look Like for Residential Students

Residential students who test positive will be moved into university isolation housing near the Homewood campus for at least 10 days from the onset of their symptoms or the date of their positive test if asymptomatic. Once the student is notified about their positive test, the COVID Support Team is also notified. This staff of student affairs professionals are here to support students through their quarantine or isolation time. Students needing to go to quarantine or isolation will be provided transportation to the quarantine or isolation space, have all their meals delivered, receive daily check-ins with Student Health and Student Affairs staff, and academic support if needed. We recognize this time could be stressful; this staff is here to support students during this time.

Residential students who have had meaningful contact with a COVID-positive person, as determined by the Johns Hopkins COVID Call Center (JHCCC), will be moved to a quarantine space on the Peabody campus. In the event our needs for quarantine exceed the availability of quarantine spaces on the Peabody campus, students who need to quarantine may be moved to a university location or another location off campus. At present, meaningful contact means being within six feet of a positive individual for more than 15 minutes within a 24-hour period. Meaningful contacts will need to quarantine for 14 days following their last exposure with a COVID positive individual even if they tested negative for COVID. Students in quarantine will also receive regular check-ins from Student Health Services and Student Affairs staff.

Off-campus students who have tested positive will be offered isolation housing on a case-by-case basis, as recommended by the Student Health and Wellness Center, and based on availability. They will not be permitted to resume on-campus activities until they are cleared by the Student Health Center.

We strongly encourage you to communicate regularly with your families/emergency contacts regarding your health especially if you need to isolate or quarantine. Student Health Services and Student Affairs, with your consent, can also communicate with your family/emergency contact if needed.

Again, we have missed you all so much this semester and are excited to see you in the new year. We hope this email and other university communications will help you plan a safe and healthy return to Baltimore. If you have any questions about the university’s return-to-campus plans, please reach out to  wellness@jhu.edu.

Be sure to take good care of yourselves during these challenging times.

Be well,

Toni Blackwell, Interim Director of Student Affairs

Townsend Plant, Associate Dean for Enrollment and Student Life

Dear Johns Hopkins Community,  

As promised this fall, we write today to confirm our plans for a careful expansion of in-person activities for the spring semester, with a few modest adjustments, based on our thorough assessment of the COVID pandemic and our extensive preparations to keep the Johns Hopkins community and our Baltimore neighbors safe.  

With our shared commitment and dedication to following best practices in containing the spread of the virus, as well as the added support of a broad-based COVID testing program, we believe we can prudently and safely move to a more extensive on-campus experience for the spring semester.  

We are closely monitoring the pandemic’s continuing impact, locally and nationally, and we are mindful of the possibility of a post-holiday spike in infections and the emergence of new variants of the virus. Yet we also see reasons for cautious optimism.  

A significant post-Thanksgiving surge did not materialize in our area to the extent feared. Further, our experience this fall, as well as those of peer institutions that conducted on-campus activities, clearly indicates that COVID infection can be managed in a university community with proper procedures, precautions, and a mutual commitment to each other’s health and safety.  

We have experienced little or no transmission on campus to date, even in the context of resumption of lab-based research, and peers have demonstrated similar effectiveness in preventing spread in classrooms. Additionally, we know that thousands of our students were in Baltimore during the fall semester and will be here in the spring regardless of our operating posture and have thus far avoided any significant outbreaks due to their diligence in following COVID safety practices in their daily lives.  

The central elements of our plan are summarized below, and the full details can be found in our updated Return to Campus guide.  

In brief, courses will begin as scheduled on Jan. 25. All classes for Homewood undergraduates will remain online until Feb. 1, at which time any in-person classes at Homewood will shift to that modality. In addition, undergraduate students will be permitted to participate in in-person research starting Feb. 8.  

Testing will begin on the Homewood campus and elsewhere on Jan. 11, and move-in and orientation for undergraduates living in Homewood residence halls will begin on Jan. 16 as planned. We expect Homewood undergraduates who will be participating in on-campus activities to arrive in Baltimore by Jan. 22. This plan, along with the one-week delay in the in-person component of Homewood undergraduate classes, will allow at least two weeks between the holidays and arrival on campus and will ensure that all undergraduates meet the requirement of at least two negative tests, appropriately spaced apart, before taking part in on-campus instruction or other activities.  

Plans for in-person instruction at the Peabody Institute and in our graduate and professional programs vary, but all will conform to university health and safety standards, including for minimum mandatory testing, as well as relevant divisional policies and plans. Each division will communicate separately about when any in-person instruction will begin. 

This plan reflects a modest but important increase in the on-campus experience for our students. Based on faculty interest and pedagogical need, the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences and Whiting School of Engineering will be offering 18% of their undergraduate courses in person this spring, allowing 45% of their undergraduate students to take at least one class in person. In addition, we will open up 50% of our on-campus residential capacity to first- and second-year students, accommodating 26% of our Homewood undergraduate students. Approximately 62% plan to live in the surrounding area, and 12% have told us they do not plan to come to Baltimore. As a reminder, all undergraduate students in Baltimore will be subject to mandatory testing at least twice weekly, and all activities will be conducted at a reduced density and in compliance with state and local requirements and public health guidelines.  

Undergirding all these efforts will be our sustained commitment to keeping one another and the broader Baltimore community safe and healthy.  

To that end, a dedicated group of students, faculty, and staff has worked to develop the Johns Hopkins Social Compact, a document outlining our mutual responsibility to each other to follow all best practices for preventing the spread of COVID. We are deeply committed to the principles and requirements of this compact, and urge you to pledge your support as well.  

Return to Campus Plans‚ÄĒSpring 2021¬†

Academic and Co-curricular Programming  

Course offerings for undergraduates will include a mix of in-person and online/remote classes. Most of our graduate divisions are also planning to resume some portion of their own on-campus activities, or have done so already, and they will continue to provide information directly to their students about academic and research opportunities.  

On-campus instruction will be conducted in classrooms prepared for distancing, ensuring at least 6 feet among students and instructors. With these protections and our expanded testing program in place, our aim is to align fully with our peers that opened successfully this fall and did not experience cases of COVID transmission related to classroom instruction.  

As a reminder, our in-person experiences this spring will be optional for faculty and students in most divisions, and a system of accommodations and adjustments remains available for staff for whom a requirement to be on campus presents extra risks. To the greatest extent possible, courses that are provided in person will also be available virtually, and students will be able to maintain their academic progress regardless of whether they are taking courses on campus or online. We are also working to ensure that opportunities exist to participate remotely in co-curricular experiences. Some additional staff will be required to work on campus in support of instructional, research, and residential activities, but many will continue to work remotely until further notice. 

COVID Testing and Other Health and Safety Protocols 

When you return to campus, you will find a robust program for COVID testing‚ÄĒincluding mandatory twice-a-week tests for undergraduates and once-a-week testing for many other students, faculty, and staff members‚ÄĒalong with extensive contact tracing operations to help us identify and isolate those who contract the virus, and thus reduce its spread. As previously noted, we have the capacity to strategically increase testing frequency if conditions require it. ¬†

We are closely monitoring the occurrence and spread of important new COVID variants, especially the more contagious ones recently detected in South Africa and the United Kingdom, and we will conduct our own genetic sequencing in samples from positive cases. We are prepared to adjust our control measures and operating posture if these variants significantly influence public health conditions and transmission within the Johns Hopkins community. 

To reduce the risk of the virus’ spread, we have made alterations to the campus, ranging from enhanced ventilation in all our classrooms to new spaces and outdoor seating for physically distant activities. Our residence halls will be de-densified, the seating areas of our campus dining facilities will be closed, and our labs will continue to operate at the reduced levels of occupancy that have helped keep our researchers safe since the summer.  

All those coming to campus will be required to use the Prodensity app for test results and to monitor their symptoms, wear face coverings at all times, and avoid large gatherings. 

Commitment to Baltimore 

Central to our decision making is our commitment to the safety and well-being of our city. We believe strongly that our community and Baltimore neighbors are better served by our maintaining close contact with students who are in the area and providing them with regular asymptomatic testing. This expanded testing program is additional and will not impact the testing capacity available in the Baltimore community or our hospitals’ and other care facilities’ ability to serve those in need during the pandemic.   

Of note, although we do not anticipate that most of our students, faculty, or staff will receive the COVID vaccine in time to affect our spring plans, it is being rapidly deployed to our front-line health care workers, which is a great source of comfort. It is not yet clear what role, if any, the university will play in vaccinating our non-clinical faculty, students, and staff, but we will continue to communicate with you as plans develop. 

The Path Ahead  

We know that so many of you are eager for the opportunity to be together in person, particularly our first-year undergraduates who have not yet had the experience of being on campus with their classmates. We also recognize the continued apprehension that attends daily living during this time.   

As we have from the outset, we will always put public health first, and continue to consider the complex set of factors and data available to us in frequent consultation with our faculty, student and staff advisory committees and national and local public health experts. If we have to change our plans, we will. Yet if we all devote ourselves to careful adherence to best practices and the well-being of our colleagues, friends and neighbors, we can complete the spring semester safely together.  

We know there will be difficult days ahead as we continue to struggle to contain this pandemic. Thank you for all you are doing to care for yourselves and one another, and for all you serve.  

We wish you a safe and healthy new year and look forward to seeing you soon, 

Ronald J. Daniels
President 

Sunil Kumar
Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs 

Mary Miller
Interim Senior Vice President for Finance and Administration 

Dear Peabody students, faculty, and staff:

As promised in my message from fall, I write today to confirm Peabody’s plans for a careful resumption of some in-person activities as scheduled for the spring semester. This decision, made in close consultation with Johns Hopkins’ leadership and public health experts, is driven by a thorough assessment of the COVID pandemic and shaped by our extensive preparations to keep the Peabody community and our Baltimore neighbors safe.

Together with the University, we are closely monitoring the pandemic’s continuing impact, locally and nationally, mindful of the possibility of a post-holiday spike in infections and the emergence of new strains of the virus. Nonetheless, there are reasons for cautious optimism. The post-Thanksgiving surge did not materialize in our area to the extent feared. Further, our experience this fall, as well as those of peer institutions that conducted on-campus activities, clearly indicates that COVID infection can be managed in a conservatory community with proper procedures, precautions, and a mutual commitment to each other’s health and safety.

With everyone’s shared commitment and dedication to following best practices in containing the spread of the virus, and the added support of a robust, broad-based, University-wide COVID testing program, we believe we can prudently and safely move to a more fulsome on-campus experience at this time.

As we announced in the fall, we are planning a hybrid semester that offers as much in-person instruction as is feasible, while continuing the remote experience across various areas of instruction, and for those unable to return to campus. All Peabody Conservatory students in all programs, both undergraduate and graduate, are invited to return to campus under this hybrid plan for the spring semester. Students who either choose to remain at home or for whom traveling to Peabody is not possible can continue to pursue a completely remote program.

ACADEMICS

Peabody classes and lessons will begin as scheduled, remotely, on January 25, with move-in and orientation for undergraduates living on campus beginning on January 21. In-person activities will begin on January 25 for Dance students and on February 1 for all others, and will focus on performance-related activities including applied lessons, chamber music and other ensembles, and technique courses, with strict adherence to distancing and room density protocols. Some lab-based courses in Music Engineering and Technology will also have an in-person component.

Most academic courses will remain in a remote format in order to limit larger gatherings and minimize density on campus; all students, whether on campus or not, will take these courses remotely. In addition, some members of the faculty will not be able to be on campus due to virus-related restrictions and will continue to teach remotely.

In keeping with recommendations for limiting travel during the pandemic, the academic calendar has been modified to replace the week-long Spring Break with five break days interspersed throughout the second half of the semester. Audition Week will take place as planned (February 14-19); large ensemble and chamber music activities will continue throughout Audition Week and current students who have returned to campus will be expected to remain on campus. 

HOUSING and DINING

In order to safely welcome students back to campus life and enhance everyone’s ability to observe social distancing guidelines, all student residential rooms will be single-occupancy for the spring semester, with limited and controlled sharing of bathroom facilities. Freshmen have received priority for on-campus housing, and sophomores are released from the residency requirement. Sophomores with concerns about securing off-campus housing should be in touch with Student Affairs. 

Peabody’s dining plan for the spring is focused on a grab-and-go model for students living in Peabody housing.

In addition, appropriate spaces have been identified and set aside for isolation and quarantine protocols should those become necessary.

TESTING

When you return to campus, you will find in place a robust program for COVID testing. Testing will be available to all, and required of many, with the potential to increase or expand required testing based on real-time positivity rates, participation rates, and public health conditions in Maryland and D.C. Testing protocols at Peabody will include the collection and testing of saliva samples on our Mt. Vernon campus.

Students must receive at least two COVID tests that are 48 hours apart prior to the start of classes, and all students will be required to participate in mandatory testing twice per week. Off-campus students may begin their testing starting on January 11. Residential students will be tested upon arrival during the designated move-in period of January 21 and 22 before they can move into their assigned room, and will need to get their second test 48 hours after their arrival test.

Testing will also be required once weekly for faculty and staff who are working on campus, as well as for contract workers, vendors, and necessary visitors. Twice weekly testing is available to on-campus faculty and staff who request it. Optional, free testing will also be available on a weekly basis for all asymptomatic affiliates who are not on campus. Faculty traveling to Maryland from out of state are advised to note the specific testing and/or quarantine protocols for their home state.

As always, those who are experiencing COVID symptoms or who may have been exposed to someone with the COVID virus should call the Johns Hopkins COVID Call Center (833-546-7546).

OTHER HEALTH AND SAFETY PROTOCOLS

We will continue to require strict adherence to proven public safety protocols including masking, physical distancing, and handwashing. For instrument-specific guidance around studio lessons and ensemble classes, please read the Conservatory’s detailed return-to-campus guidance for applied instruction at peabody.jhu.edu/campusguidance. These protocols have been developed with input from the university’s leading health experts to ensure the safety of our community. 

Daily health monitoring using ProDensity will continue to be required for those on campus. Please note that influenza vaccination is also required for all affiliates who will be on campus. The JHU Return to Campus Guidance contains more detail about testing, quarantine and isolation, and other university-wide public health measures.

To reduce the risk of the virus’ spread, some alterations have been made to the campus, including signage reinforcing the need to remain physically distant from each other, enhanced ventilation in our buildings, and specially-outfitted low-latency rooms for vocalists. With the guidance of JHU public health professionals, we are ensuring that common areas and teaching spaces are cleaned and disinfected appropriately with time between scheduled activities for rooms to rest. The practice room reservation system introduced this fall will continue to be in place for individual practice and for small, masked chamber groups.

Undergirding all of these efforts will be our sustained commitment to keeping one another and the broader Baltimore community safe and healthy. To that end, a dedicated group of students, faculty, and staff has worked to develop the Johns Hopkins Social Compact, a document outlining our mutual responsibility to each other to follow all best practices for preventing the spread of COVID. Peabody’s leadership is deeply committed to the principles and requirements of this compact, and I urge you to pledge your support as well.

It is not yet clear what role, if any, the university will play in vaccinating faculty, students, and staff, but we will continue to communicate with you as plans develop. We are hopeful about the potential for the vaccine to bring the COVID pandemic under control, but our plans for this semester do not rely on it.

MOVING FORWARD

We know that many of you are eager to return to campus, particularly for your lessons and other applied areas of your studies as performing artists. We also recognize the continued apprehension that attends daily living during this time and the heightened anxiety that comes along with many discipline-specific concerns.

There will be many questions, which we will begin to address at virtual town hall meetings planned for students on Thursday, January 14, at 3:30 pm, and for faculty on Wednesday, January 13, at 1:00 pm. Invitations to these events will be sent separately.

As we have from the outset, we will always put the health and safety of our community first. There will be difficult days ahead as we continue to struggle to contain this pandemic, and if we have to change our plans based on public health considerations, we will. But I believe that if we all devote ourselves to careful adherence to best practices and the well-being of our colleagues, friends, and neighbors, we can complete the spring semester safely together.

Thank you for all you are doing to care for yourselves and one another. I wish you a safe and healthy new year and look forward to seeing you soon.

Sincerely,

Fred Bronstein
Dean

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As detailed in the Jan. 8 communication, the university is preparing for careful expansion of in-person activities for the spring semester, including welcoming some additional undergraduate students to campus. With our collective commitment and dedication to following best practices in containing the spread of COVID-19, as well as the added support of a broad-based COVID testing program, we believe we can prudently and safely move to a more extensive on-campus experience for the spring semester.

Undergraduate students who have fulfilled the mandatory testing requirement will be permitted to work on-site in student jobs and paid campus internships under the following conditions: 

  1. The job requires the student be physically on-site in order to fulfill job duties (if the role can be performed remotely, it must be).
  2. The student adheres to all university safety guidelines, including completion of a daily health check within Prodensity (daily green pass), compliance with influenza vaccine requirements (documented by the green pass in Prodensity), universal use of face coverings, maintaining social distancing, and adhering to any other worksite requirements specific to the role. 
  3. A staff member must be on-site at all times to supervise student workers or a documented supervisory plan must be in place at the department level.

If all requirements are met, students can start working right away.

Students and hiring departments should use our University Experiential Learning platform, SMILE, to post and apply for positions. Students and staff who are not registered on SMILE should do so as soon as possible. 

NOTE: All positions posted on SMILE are non-credit-bearing, compensated via JHU payroll, and part-time. As in the fall semester, the university will not be able to offer new employment opportunities to students who are not physically located in the United States. Students who are currently working (active in payroll) and unable to come to the U.S. due to current COVID restrictions but who have an active U.S. work authorization may likely continue to work and be paid on U.S. payroll. As this situation is fluid, the university will evaluate a student’s ability to continue on JHU’s payroll from outside the United States on a case-by-case basis. International students reentering the U.S. must quarantine as required per any federal/state guidelines.

All aid packages continue to include work-study for both fall and spring. Students who are unable to work can request additional aid through the appeals process.

For any questions regarding student employment, please contact me at nlantz2@jhu.edu.

Sincerely,

Nickolas Lantz
Executive Director for University Experiential Learning

Dear Johns Hopkins Community, 

The spring semester is nearly upon us. Undergraduates began moving into our residence halls over the weekend, and next week, many of our divisions will begin their first in-person classes in almost a year. In the days ahead, more faculty, staff, and students will return to our campuses, and we wish to inform you of several policies and procedures that will be in place for on-campus work and the use of our facilities to foster safety during the COVID pandemic. Full details are available in our Return to Campus guidance, and a summary of several key points is below. 

Facilities access 

Access to JHU facilities will generally require the use of ID card-enabled doors or security stations to support monitoring of building use and compliance with health assessment and testing requirements. Affiliates who have key access to alternate doors are asked to enter through monitored or card reader-enabled doors and swipe in or display their Johns Hopkins ID upon access. To facilitate this access requirement, additional card reader devices have been installed on the Homewood campus so that each building has at least one card access-controlled door. Over the next year, additional card reader installations will be completed.   

Note that many doors operate with ADA controls and may open and close slowly. Affiliates do not need to wait for the door to close each time but must swipe their card when they enter. 

Rules for the use of on-campus facilities will be consistent with our academic and research priorities as outlined in our Return to Research and Return to Instruction guides. We anticipate that all current rules and procedures, including research density, use of individual offices, etc., will remain in effect throughout the spring semester. More details about acceptable and restricted use of facilities on the Homewood campus are available here. Information about the use of facilities on other JHU campuses will be communicated by the relevant divisions. 

Reporting to work 

Even with the resumption of some on-campus instruction and other activities, in-person work for faculty and staff is still limited to those who need to be physically present for teaching, research, clinical services, or campus operations. All others will likely continue to work remotely throughout the spring semester. Each dean’s office and University Administration is ultimately responsible for determining who is expected or permitted to return to campus. You should not report to work in person unless you have been instructed or authorized to do so. 

Some members of our community face a greater risk from COVID-19 than others, and we encourage faculty, staff, and students who have concerns about their individual circumstances to consider consulting with the Office of Institutional Equity (OIE) or Human Resources (HR) about the process for seeking a reasonable accommodation or adjustment. More information for faculty, staff, and postdoctoral fellows on the accommodations process may be found on the OIE website or accessibility.jhu.edu, or by phone (410-516-8075) or email (oie@jhu.edu or OIEdisability@jhu.edu). We also recognize that the pandemic has created a host of new stresses for our workforce, and the university has created or enhanced a variety of resources to help, including expanded support for childcare. More information is available here. 

COVID testing 

Each school has established policies for testing their asymptomatic affiliates. Broadly, testing will be required twice weekly for undergraduates and at least once weekly for any affiliate who is either participating in or directly supporting in-person, on-campus classes (with exceptions for clinically based instruction) or regularly exposed to undergraduates. Details regarding testing expectations will be distributed directly from the school. More details on how to schedule an appointment and the hours and locations of testing facilities are available here. Compliance with required testing will be documented through the ProDensity app. 

Please note that anyone who has tested positive for the COVID virus during the previous 90 days is temporarily exempt from any asymptomatic testing requirements because continued testing in this population would continue to detect the virus, even after the individuals are no longer sick or contagious.  

Travel 

University business travel remains restricted, and personal travel discouraged. In December, Gov. Hogan issued an emergency order requiring Marylanders to limit all travel to essential purposes only. All Marylanders who do travel outside of Maryland or any individuals who travel to Maryland must either obtain a negative COVID-19 test result or self-quarantine for 10 days. This applies to all states, with the exception of Delaware, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia, and Washington, D.C. Johns Hopkins students, faculty, and staff who must travel can use university COVID testing to fulfill those requirements. 

The state’s travel requirements are in addition to Johns Hopkins’ requirements, which include self-quarantining upon return until a negative test result is received. This semester, we will also be instituting a registration requirement for any travel. Details on how to register will be communicated soon. 

We thank you for your hard work to fulfill the university’s mission of education, research, and service under the difficult conditions posed by the pandemic. We are excited at the opportunity to expand our in-person activity on our campuses, and we ask for your patience and understanding as we all adjust to new practices and procedures to keep each other safe and healthy. 

Be well, 

Stephen Gange   
Professor and Executive Vice Provost for Academic Affairs   

Jane Schlegel 
Vice President and Chief Administrative Officer 

Dear Students, Faculty, and Staff, 

We write with the encouraging news that after a spike in COVID cases among Homewood undergraduates last week, new cases have remained in the low single digits for the last several days, indicating that our containment measures have been successful and allowing us to return to in-person classes and other activities tomorrow. 

This turnaround is a testament to the strength of our community and the commitment and fortitude of our students, and we thank you for your cooperation and patience with one another through a difficult time.   

In order to ensure that we can sustain the current low rate of COVID spread within our community, we will not return immediately to all the policies and protocols that were in place before this COVID cluster. The following rules and guidance will be in effect for undergraduates starting 8 a.m. on Thursday, while we continue to monitor our campus: 

  • 5-Person Limit on All Undergraduate Gatherings. This 5-person limit is a stricter standard than the city requires and will apply to all JHU undergraduates, on and off campus, indoors and outdoors, through the end of February. It includes roommates, housemates, and common areas, and both masks and physical distancing are still required. If circumstances allow, we will further relax this rule in March.¬†
  • Stay-at-Home Orders Lifted. All remaining stay-at-home orders for undergraduates are lifted as of 8 a.m. on Thursday. Students in isolation or quarantine must continue to follow the instructions of our Health & Wellness staff.¬†
  • Mandatory 3x/Week COVID Testing. Undergraduates on and off campus are required to test 3x per week (e.g. M-W-F or Tu-Th-Sa) for the foreseeable future. This increased level of testing has been recommended by public health experts to more quickly identify and isolate COVID-positive students and begin contact tracing. ¬†
  • Avoid Indoor Dining. We strongly discourage all students from eating or drinking in restaurants or bars even if allowed by local ordinances. These activities are particularly dangerous from a public health perspective because they place you unmasked in close proximity to others indoors.¬†
  • Outdoor and Virtual Exercise. The O‚ÄôConnor Recreation Center will reopen on Feb. 22. Students should exercise outside when possible or join our virtual classes. Using an off-campus gym is acceptable so long as you follow the rules of the facility, stay masked, physically distance, and wash hands frequently.¬†

More information about our policies and guidelines is available on covidinfo.jhu.edu, including answers to many frequently asked questions, and resources to help maintain your health and wellness during the pandemic are available here. 

Any time you are in doubt about whether a certain activity is allowed, we urge you to remember the seriousness of the pandemic and to err on the side of caution.  

In addition, we all have a responsibility to keep our community and our neighbors safe. If you have any concerns or witness behavior that could put our community at risk, please let us know through the LiveSafe app, which is the best way to report issues in real time and provides the option of anonymity. You may also call 844-SPEAK2US to report concerns. The university follows up on all reports. 

Last week‚Äôs COVID cluster is a reminder of just how quickly the virus can spread, and how careful we all must be in order to carry out our plans for in-person classes and activities this semester. It is also a reminder that we‚Äôre all in this together‚ÄĒeach individual‚Äôs actions can put the community at greater risk or make it safer. We are grateful to all those who made sacrifices in the last week to bring the spike in cases under control, and we join you in looking forward to better days.¬†

Sunil Kumar  
Provost  

Alanna Shanahan  
Vice Provost for Student Affairs  

Kevin Shollenberger  
Vice Provost for Student Health and Well-Being